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 Table of Contents  
EDITORIAL
Year : 2016  |  Volume : 6  |  Issue : 2  |  Page : 59-60

Editorial message for volume 6 issue 2 of IJMD (July - December 2016)


Editor-in-Chief, Professor and Head, Department of Oral Pathology and Microbiology, Sree Balaji Dental College and Hospital, Velachery Main Road, Pallikaranai, Chennai - 600 100, Tamil Nadu, India

Date of Web Publication6-Jan-2017

Correspondence Address:
KMK Masthan
Editor-in-Chief, Professor and Head, Department of Oral Pathology and Microbiology, Sree Balaji Dental College and Hospital, Velachery Main Road, Pallikaranai, Chennai - 600 100, Tamil Nadu
India
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Source of Support: None, Conflict of Interest: None


DOI: 10.4103/2229-6360.197744

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How to cite this article:
Masthan K. Editorial message for volume 6 issue 2 of IJMD (July - December 2016). Indian J Multidiscip Dent 2016;6:59-60

How to cite this URL:
Masthan K. Editorial message for volume 6 issue 2 of IJMD (July - December 2016). Indian J Multidiscip Dent [serial online] 2016 [cited 2017 Nov 23];6:59-60. Available from: http://www.ijmdent.com/text.asp?2016/6/2/59/197744

From the Editor's desk

This issue has a large segment of original research articles. When I went through them, I was able to appreciate distinctive styles for each article which set me thinking and Googling about the art and science of article writing. What I came across the Internet and my opinions I share with the readers now. The article for a medical journal must address the reader's thirst for information and arouse the reader's curiosity to browse through the entire article instead of seeing the headlines and the authors' names and passing onto the next article. Basically, writing starts from vacuum with the seed of the concept in the mind of the author only. When the author consolidates his idea into the introductory paragraph, he must frame it in such a way that the interest of the reader is piqued first and, for that, the author must also take into account the spectrum of readers who are likely to read the article.

It is more systematic if the author reviews all the available technical contents that are in his hands and the scope for any further material he might need to complete the article. He must keep a mental log of the limits of his article; subjectwise and spacewise and also keep an eye on the deadline to complete the article. In addition, it is advisable to familiarize himself with the policies and rules for submission of the journal to which he is going to submit the article.

Through an article, an author must effectively accomplish conveying what is in his mind to the reader using the shortest possible words with a focus on the relevance of the details he provides. The sequence and the headings must have a smooth, uninterrupted flow and, if any extraordinary or unusual concept has to be conveyed, a mildly persuasive style can be adapted.

Many a novice author errs on what to put in and what to leave out in the article from his gathered data. The relevance of the details is three pronged. First of them is that the details must coincide with the tone of the article. Second is that the details provided must sound reasonable to the reader to reach the same conclusion as the author and, if necessary, they must be adequate to persuade the reader to reach the same conclusion as the author. Third is that the details must serve the purpose of the article and if it is extraneous and useless to the article, such details must be omitted.

One lacuna I have often observed with some authors is that they start with the historical background of the issue they discuss. That is acceptable. But, to dwell more into that, occupying one-third to one-half of the article space is likely to frustrate the reader and may make him move on to the next article. One more mistake some authors often commit is that they forego the legal disclaimer part of the concept they convey. Therefore, the author must lay emphasis on the fact that the analyses and conclusions of the article are to be taken only at a hypothetical and, utmost, theoretical level and, right away, such ideas must not be implemented bypassing the safeguards of the medical system such as Animal Trials, ICMR Clearance and Ethical Committee Approval. Such foregoings may prove expensive in terms of litigation even years later. Hence, it is always safe to stress that further studies are required to implement these concepts in clinical practice. It is always safer to list out the details of authority obtained for collecting and revealing patient data, vital statistics, fluid and tissue samples, purview and the jurisdiction of the mentioned authority, preferably at the beginning of the article.

A good author must be able to sift through the data and strain the data in such a way that the absolutely essential data alone become part of the article. That way, the author will not lose the precious attention of the reader. An excellent authorship always facilitates channels for readers' feedback; provides grid or platform for continuation of the same study under different circumstances by different persons. I observed such expert authorship in two of the original research articles that form part of this issue and I express wholehearted welcome for this trend. Readers' suggestions and feedback are welcome at masthankmk@gmail.com.

Best wishes,




 

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